Articles filed in category 'JavaScript'

  • Did you know that you can create a simple one-line menu system using two C# classes and a little bit of Razor code in an MVC page to create a hierarchical menu structure for drop-down menus? Paul shows you how.
  • Shawn introduces you to Vue.js, a framework that can keep complex build systems from clogging up your app. It’s a SPA library that helps you separate the data from the markup, but it’s also much more.
  • These days, your code really must work across all of the various platforms. Unless you plan to learn a lot of languages, you’ll want to apply Nic’s tips for using NativeScript.
  • Brian explores node.js and shows you the basic concepts needed to develop with it.
  • Sahil continues his series on Angular 2 and this time, looks at that essential element, the form.
  • If Just-in-Time compilation is getting you down because of slow runtime launches, you’ll be excited to learn about how Ahead-of-Time compilation can make your apps smaller and more efficient. Sahil shows you how.
  • Bilal takes a look at making sure that your Angular app, large or small, can deal with state management and data access using the ngrx/store module.
  • Have you ever wondered how to use your browser (and those of your customers) as rich clients without plug-ins or ActiveX objects? Shawn Wildermuth tells you how.
  • Sahil shows us a few nifty aspects of AngularJS 2 that help experienced and novice developers alike. AngularJS 2 is still in beta, but he says that you’ll love it even so.
  • In the first installment of this series, I explored a few of the new features in ASP.NET MVC 4, including the new default project templates, mobile templates, and display modes. Since that article, ASP.NET MVC 4 has been released to beta. For brevity’s sake, when I refer to MVC the design pattern, I’m referring to the ASP.NET implementation of the pattern. In this installment, I’m going to focus on one of MVC’s most useful features: integrated JavaScript and CSS bundling and minification.
  • Increasingly, users have come to expect that applications they use continue to respond while the application processes information in the background. To achieve the best responsiveness, you need to build applications to be as asynchronous as possible. In the past, creating asynchronous operations consisted of passing callback delegates or lambda expressions to indicate what action to take when an action completes. These can lead to an unmanageable mess of spaghetti code.
  • Although I’m now a huge advocate of test-driven-development, I was not an immediate convert to the school of thought. I understood the necessity of unit testing:
  • If you need to build a SPA that works across a variety of devices and platforms, you need to check out Aurelia. Jim and Jeremy take a fascinating look at what you can do with the open-source UI JavaScript framework called Aurelia that doesn’t behave like a framework.
  • Sahil shows us how DevOps (formerly called VSTS) can connect disparate functionality using two of his favorite tools: Docker and Angular.
  • Bootstrap 2.x was a great product, but you’ll build more attractive, more inviting, and more accessible websites with the next Bootstrap. Jim and Scott tell us what’s new.
  • The modern web ecosystem is made up of many different types of scenarios of how users interact with online content. With the increasing popularity of mobile devices along with countless hours at Starbucks and on airplanes, users may often find themselves in a position of wanting to use web content while not being able to enjoy reliable and continual access to the Internet.
  • Rick illustrates the benefits and shortcomings of using NodeJS, and also builds a handy tool for making shortened URLs while he’s at it!
  • Rick follows up on his server-side Angular back end for ASP.NET Core with this interesting look at the matching front end.
  • Node.js by itself is a blank canvas. However, the Express.js web framework for Node.js provides programmers with a clear, concise development platform to build high performance Web APIs.
  • In another of his articles on Angular, Paul dives into global configurations and shows you how to access your Angular applications from any component or service class.
  • Sahil gives some excellent suggestions for dealing with a multiple-platform world using Apache Cordova and a single code base. He’s going to debug with TypeScript and sourcemaps, so you’ll (nearly) be a Cordova expert!
  • Building mobile apps is a wave you need to catch! Paul shows you that you won’t be left behind just because you use Web Forms.
  • Wijmo contains over 30 widgets built on jQuery and jQuery UI that can help you build a better Web.
  • These days, you can’t build apps for a single platform. Jason shows you how to use Facebook’s open source tool React Native to save wear and tear on development teams and the bottom line.
  • Paul begins a new series on working within HTML and the Web API with this close-up look at JavaScript and jQuery. You’ll learn some of the juicy details, but you’ll also get a good overview of what these technologies can do for you.
  • In this second installment of his new series on working within HTML and the Web API, Paul looks at the four standard HTTP verbs GET, POST, PUT, and DELETE. By creating a product information page with mock data, you’ll get a good idea of the power of these tools.
  • You’ve probably heard about Facebook’s new JavaScript library, React. Milton shows you how it works and encourages you to consider using it on your next project.
  • Microsoft unveiled the Windows Developer Preview, a pre-beta version of Windows 8 for developers, at the Microsoft BUILD conference in September 2011. The most compelling new feature for developers and users alike is the new Metro style user interface.
  • Harkening to Dick Tracy comics, the new “smart” watch creates new opportunities for creative development. Wei-Meng introduces us to the coolest new mobile app-development platform with an exploration of what the Pebble is capable of already and some interesting things to think about for building your own apps.
  • MooTools is an object-oriented JavaScript framework aimed at experienced web developers who need to write effective code quickly, effectively, and in a cross-browser manner. Dino walks you through how to use it and why you just might want to.
  • Have you ever watched someone impatiently click again and again on a button? Paul explains how that can slow the server down and how to prevent the delay. He also looks at glyphs that tell users that their device got the message and is working on it.
  • Craig builds a simple application that reveals the states, dependencies, and methods of navigation that you’ll need in order to fully understand the Angular UI Router framework.
  • Rod addresses the issues in the ever-changing scenery of Java frameworks.
  • Paul continues his series on Bootstrap by creating a custom product selection system that keeps a running total of a user’s purchases.
  • Sahil pours his vast SharePoint prowess into building apps that put languages on equal footings with one another.
  • Paul teaches us how to use Bootstrap’s accordion features to make easily mobile-adaptable navigation panels.
  • CRUD’s a part of everyday life for a lot of devs. If you’re one of them, you’ll be interested in this first installation of Paul’s new series on using Angular.
  • Building on his article in the last issue, Paul adds HTML, Angular code, and Web API methods so that the user can add, edit, and delete product data.
  • In the third and final segment of his series on using CRUD in Angular, Paul adds additional server-side validation to the generated Entity Framework classes. He also shows us the client-side validation and validates data in Angular.
  • If your synchronous load drowns in a sea of code, a lifeboat can be found in NodeJS. Chris explains how to use node streams to organize the flow of data.
  • Learn how to use the IHttpActionResult methods in the .NET Controller class to deal with exceptions when Paul explores the messages that no one likes to receive.
  • Joe helps you understand the emerging front-end framework technology that’s showing up everywhere these days.
  • Once upon a time. HTML forms were invented to provide a link between the various functions in an application. Then other tools pushed them aside. But the time has come for HTML forms to rise from the cinders and take their rightful place in Web development. George shows you how and why.
  • Miguel looks at organizing styles and integrating technologies to make one spiffy new kind of app with multi-SPA layers, and you don’t have to throw away your Microsoft experience to do it.
  • Nowadays archiving, searching and processing the explosion of data generated in applications means coming up with nontraditional ways of dealing with the data. NoSQL solutions offer intriguing and unique ways of handling the volumes of data available to us. Additionally, 10Gen offers an open source distributed document-oriented solution called MongoDB.
  • The newest member of the jQuery family of projects is jQuery Mobile. A good way to describe what jQuery Mobile is to think of it as jQuery UI for mobile devices. If you have wanted to write mobile-optimized UIs over your applications, jQuery Mobile is a library that you will want to add to your bag of tricks. Like jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile is themeable. This article makes two assumptions. First, you are familiar with jQuery and second, you are familiar with jQuery UI. If ...See More
  • Chris shows you that you can’t depend on SPAs to do all the dirty work anymore. Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) not only have more capabilities, but they make your users’ experience much snappier.
  • In a previous article, I wrote about how simple it is to deploy an ASP.NET MVC Web Application to Windows Azure using Team Foundation Service hosted at tfspreview.com. In this article, I will build on those concepts and show you how to build and deploy a simple Node.js website to Azure using Git as the source code repository. One of Azure’s core strengths is its openness. In addition to the .NET SDK, Azure has SDKs for Java, PHP, Python and for the purposes of this artic...See More
  • If you need to navigate around your Single-Page Application (SPA), you’ll want to know about routing in Angular. Paul shows you how.
  • As the bedrock to the web, HTML has evolved in many ways from its birth in 1991. While the markup language has had its share of ups and downs, the advent of what’s being called “HTML5” is a welcome and much anticipated addition of new semantic capabilities and valuable APIs.
  • Is dealing with databases on a browser your idea of a bad nightmare? Craig implements an in-browser document database called IndexedDB to create, read, update, and delete large sets of records, just like a database on a server.
  • There’s no time to waste! Chris jumps right into Node Modules, and soon you won’t know how you ever re-used code without them.
  • Numbers and arithmetic can be a challenge in any language, and John shows you how to deal with them in JavaScript.
  • John elaborates on a useful preventative in JavaScript.
  • John starts his new series on JavaScript with a list of interesting problems and solutions.
  • Sahil explores the three cardinal rules of working on any JavaScript project and introduces some cool new tools.
  • Facebook’s ReactJS copyright is a curious combination of the BSD OSS license and a grant document. John tells you what that means and whether or not that’s good news for your project.
  • Continuing his series on Angular, Paul looks at logging as a reporting tool for debugging, warnings, errors, and other types of messages, as well as calling classes to log to the console, local storage, and Web API.
  • These days, you can’t build your apps for only one platform, which could mean multiple dev teams and keeping track of parallel projects. Jason shows us how to use React Native to get the best mobile development without breaking the bank or going crazy.
  • When considering mobile development, you have a variety of techniques to choose from. In many cases, reactive rendering (using CSS media queries) provides a good solution. Additional mobile customization can be achieved by using ASP.NET MVC4 device detection/customization to provide adaptive rendering. Both of these techniques follow the traditional Web development pattern where each page is focused on a specific task. In an application managing a list, there is a page d...See More
  • I foresee that in a couple of years pretty much any Web site will be easy to consume from within mainstream devices. I deliberately used the term “mainstream devices” instead of more specific terms like tablets and smartphones just to give a measure of how fluid the situation is.
  • You might have heard about Node.js and always wanted to try it. With Ben’s guidance, you can get a simple Node.js app up and running, and learn about some other useful tools as you go.
  • Just when JavaScript seemed aggravatingly ubiquitous, Rick bumped into Web Assembly and Blazor, and learned that there are choices when it comes to compiling code.
  • If you are like many developers, you are using Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) to provide services to Windows Forms, WPF, Silverlight, ASP.NET and possibly Windows 8 Store applications. Now your boss is asking you to develop some mobile applications using HTML 5 and jQuery. You know you can reuse many of your WCF services, but you are having trouble calling them from jQuery without breaking your existing applications. In this article, I will walk you through the s...See More
  • In the first installment of his new series, Paul addresses who needs access to what in Angular, and how to make sure that nothing unpleasant happens on the client-side.
  • In this second installment of his Angular security series, Paul authenticates a user against a SQL Server table and secures Web API methods with the JSON Web Token standard.
  • In this third installment of his Angular security series, Paul addresses the Angular 6 release and shows you how to build an array of claims without single properties for security.
  • It seems you cannot turn in one direction or another and not hear about a new JavaScript library or CSS framework that promises to be the silver bullet-to be THE thing that will make web-based application development a breeze. This article will introduce you to Knockout.js (http://knockoutjs.com/). Knockout.js is an open source library (under the MIT License) that is pure JavaScript that works with any existing web framework and every mainstream browser. Further, Knockou...See More
  • TypeScript is a new Microsoft offering that seeks to change the way we write JavaScript. As the name implies, TypeScript associates a strongly typed layer in conjunction with JavaScript. TypeScript also associates an object-oriented layer with JavaScript.
  • My first experience with AWS was building a prototype for a website called Attachments.me. My friend Jesse Miller and I built the site over several weekends, and hosted it on a single EC2 instance. Two years, dozens of EC2 instances, and hundreds of thousands of users later, we’re still on AWS.
  • If you've ever wondered how to commit changes to a database using ASP.NET Web API as the service provider, Jeff Etter gives you the recipe for the secret sauce.
  • Derick shows us how to achieve a high level of interactivity in our Web applications with small-scale functionality.
  • If you want your Web page to hold audio recordings that play when users want them to, you’ll want to read John’s article. He shows you that it’s not only quick, but it’s easy!
  • Bilal takes us on a tour of Telerik’s Kendo UI and its great number of widgets that facilitate your Web or mobile app development process. There’s no need for multiple libraries anymore!
  • Sometimes it happens that a new version of an operating system introduces a new type of application completely incompatible with older versions of the same system. The last time it happened I think it was with Windows 95. More than 15 years later, Windows 8 comes with support for a completely new segment of applications named Windows Store apps.
  • When you wrap your JavaScript code into a closure, you won’t have bugs caused by unnecessary variables. Paul shows you how to do this using a templating tool called Mustache, which will help you get closer to coding in Angular.
  • You’ve been hearing a lot about Angular and it’s time to see what it can do for you. Paul continues his excellent series on Angular, the tool you need to create solid, reusable, and extensible code.
  • Paul continues his deep dive into AngularJS. This time, he uses this important tool to insert, update, and delete data by building some Web API calls.
  • Paul continues his deep dive into AngularJS. This time, he adds validation to the page so you can spot input errors.
  • The Module Pattern is not a new topic or unique to JavaScript. Yet for many that are new to JavaScript, the Module Pattern is a topic that eludes. Whether you are an experienced JavaScript developer or are just getting acquainted with the language, knowing what the Module Pattern is and how to implement it, it is absolutely essential if you hope to attain success with JavaScript. In this article, I will briefly cover what the Module Pattern is and how you can immediately apply the pattern.
  • This oft-maligned language is made compelling when John takes it apart for us.
  • In another of his edifying series, John shows us how to get a response whether your code fails or succeeds using promises.
  • In this continuation of his series, Sahil focuses on TypeScript and why it’s mandatory if you want to write good, reliable code in JavaScript.
  • If you need your data secure, there’s probably no better way to ensure it than a Blockchain. Wei-Meng explains how it all works and then helps you build your own.
  • If you have some small files to upload to a Web API, there’s no reason to use the same cumbersome process that works for larger files. Paul shows you how to save a lot of time and effort using Angular.
  • Web Forms aren’t going anywhere. Paul shows us how to use HTML 5 and jQuery to keep ASP.NET Web Forms working smoothly.
  • Microsoft has added an abundance of new features and functionality to ASP.NET 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012. This article provides an overview of many of those new features and enhancements ranging from improved editors for HTML, CSS and JavaScript all the way through to publishing your work to the web.
  • Chris shows you not only how, but also why you really want to use a Micro JavaScript Library.
  • Using this new tool and a few familiar ones, Sahil shows us how to build a simple app that we can sell on Apple or Windows App Stores.
  • Sahil takes a look at some strange behavior on the part of JavaScript. He provides a list of common mistakes and what to do about them.
  • These days, you can’t target only one platform with your innovative apps. They have to look good on many types of devices and operating systems. Sahil looks at how Xamarin and Cordova translate into native apps and how you can use a combination to build even more versatile systems than ever before.