Articles filed in category 'IOS'

  • You can avoid all that pesky overhead when dealing with multiple platforms by using Microsoft’s library of APIs, Xamarin.Forms. Wei-Meng shows you how to efficiently map to the various platforms’ respective native UI elements at run time.
  • You can sell your app with creative marketing, but you’ve got to do something more to get customers to not only open your app but use it, too. Jason takes a look at onboarding techniques.
  • These days, your code really must work across all of the various platforms. Unless you plan to learn a lot of languages, you’ll want to apply Nic’s tips for using NativeScript.
  • There’s no longer a simple answer to what sort of device your page will be viewed upon. Walt examines the options and shows you how to make sure that yours will look great on anything, old or new.
  • Jason explores TestFlight, a new tool for testing your iOS apps. It has some nifty notification tools, which makes it easier to have a lot of testers—or just a few, depending on what your product needs. Check out what else it has going for it.
  • Jason explores TestFlight, a new tool for testing your iOS apps. It has some nifty notification tools, which make it easier to have a lot of testers—or just a few, depending on what your product needs. Check out what else it has going for it.
  • Remember just a few years ago when we were all excited to get touch technology on our phones, laptops, and tablets? The Next Big Thing is here, and Jason shows us how to develop for the Apple Watch.
  • In this article, you will create a CODE Framework RESTful service and an iPhone application from scratch. For the client side, you will utilize XCode (yes, you’ll need a Mac!), which uses Objective-C as the primary language. This article won’t teach you the language; you need to know the basics of Objective-C. Even if you don’t know anything about it but want to code right away, read the article “Building a Twitter Search Client on iOS,” by Ben Scherman, available for al...See More
  • Take a look at third-party applications and code before sitting down to develop because the tools you need to build your masterpiece might already be available. Jason shows us some clever shortcuts as he builds a weather app.
  • This article will cover building a simple Twitter client that allows users to search for tweets, save those search terms, and recall them at any time. The sample in this article will use Xcode 4 and the iPhone SDK 4.3. All examples are in Objective-C. You can find the code for this article at http://github.com/subdigital/code-mag-twitter-searcher. I encourage you to download the code to help out if you get stuck.
  • Did you ever think you’d be programming apps without code? Mohammad show you how, using Apple’s iMessages framework, iOS 10, a little bit of Swift, and some Sticker Packs.
  • Chris shows us how to make sure that your app is not only cross-platform, but international and global as well.
  • In Apple’s new releases, there are a ton of new features to play with—even the AppStore has changed. Jason shows you how all of this impacts your development chores.
  • Wei-Meng gives us a step-by-step guide to making seamless cross-platform mobile apps with Xamarin.
  • Sticker packs and emojis are used by everyone from teenagers to developers. Jason shows you how these simple tools can be more than a basic form of communication.
  • As part of his series, Walt dives deeply into Xamarin.Forms and roots around in the details of the object model.
  • Using Firebase Cloud Messaging, Wei-Meng shows you how to enable PWA push notifications as if they were native code, and how to host your REST API as a serverless app.
  • While creating a simple little mobile game app, Jason shows us the power of Game Center’s tools.
  • You’ve made your website pretty spiffy, but the one thing it’s missing is the one thing that makes social media platforms so hard to compete with. Add sound and video to your content by making it YouTube-capable. Jason shows you how!
  • These days, you can’t build your apps for only one platform, which could mean multiple dev teams and keeping track of parallel projects. Jason shows us how to use React Native to get the best mobile development without breaking the bank or going crazy.
  • If you’ve been paying attention to programming trends, you’ll see that Swift, Apple’s new language, is gaining popularity at an impressive rate. You don’t have to toss out everything you already know, though, as Jason helps you see Swift’s similarities to Objective-C.
  • You can use Xamarin to directly access native iOS APIs and still take advantage of what you know about C# and the .NET Framework. Jason shows us just how easy it is.
  • The world has evolved away from single-platform apps. Sahil shows us how Apple’s new Swift language encourages new opportunities, whether you’re programming for iOS or otherwise.
  • EPS builds a user interface for the iOS that is very similar to the Android and desktop versions.
  • With all the new things on the market, it’s hard to keep a user’s attention where it belongs: on your app. Jason explores the push-notification aspects of One Signal to help you keep your app in the forefront.
  • Jason shows us how to keep the development team focused on developing while creating built-in post-launch features that keep your users happy too. It’s not magic, it’s Intercom.io.
  • What if, as a developer, you could focus all of your efforts on building a robust front-end experience and not have to worry about constructing a complex backend infrastructure? Jason shows us how to do just that with Parse.
  • Want a great way to tell prospective customers or conference attendees that you’re open for business? Wei-Meng explains how iBeacons work, tells you how to build one, and shows you many clever uses for iOS and Android mobile devices.
  • Xamarin has a new version of their Cross-Platform Mobile Development tool out, and Jason takes you on a tour of all the great new features.