Articles filed in category 'Editorials'

  • Ken Getz Finalize Column Mar/April 06
  • Rod Paddock Editorial January February 2004 Issue
  • This is where you would normally expect our popular “Post Mortem” column: An interesting article that describes a project after it is complete and some interesting points about things that went well and things that didn’t. This month is different, however, because this is the 10-year anniversary edition of <i>CODE Magazine</i>! So while <i>CODE Magazine </i>isn’t a project that is “complete” and we certainly expect the magazine to continue on for a long time to come (bot...See More
  • Rod Paddock July/August 2009 Editorial
  • This page is dedicated to non-technical aspects of our lives as developers.Look here in each issue for commentary and insight into the struggles and joys of balancing life and logic.
  • Accessible technology eliminates barriers for people with disabilities and it enables individuals to take full advantage of their capabilities."-Bill Gates, Chairman, Microsoft CorporationAccessible technology eliminates barriers for people with disabilities and it enables individuals to take full advantage of their capabilities."-Bill Gates, Chairman, Microsoft Corporation
  • Rick Strahl discusses Windows Vista for developers.
  • Rick discusses WCF
  • At Mix 2007 in Las Vegas, Microsoft announced Silverlight (formerly known as WPF/E) to much fanfare. Silverlight is very intriguing in concept, as it further travels the path previously laid out by WPF (Silverlight’s big brother), and it aims to bring the worlds of Windows and Web development, as well as the worlds of software development and graphical design, much closer together. As more and more details emerge (and the first released version is now available), it beco...See More
  • Rod's about to embark on a large-scale legacy conversion and he talks about the process before they begin.
  • Rod tells us about the complexities of a legacy code conversion project.
  • Rod's project continues and he gives us some good advice about managing a team.
  • Two roads diverged in a wood, and we… we took the one that led straight to hell, where we thought nothing of reconciling ourselves to the sad state of software affairs that followed.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial May June 2002 Issue
  • Mar/April Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Rod reflects on 100 issues of CODE Magazine.
  • When I was asked to write a few pages on what's coming in the next version of Microsoft Visual Studio .NET (code named Whidbey), the biggest issue I had was how to limit this article to a few pages.I opted to list a few categories and drill down into each. I'm not going to cover everything, just some key items in each area. Please note that not all of these changes are implemented in the PDC build that attendees are receiving, and that some of these features are still in...See More
  • Markus Egger discusses declarative programming
  • In this article, Rick discusses the new features of IIS 7.
  • May/June 2007 Doc Detective column
  • Rick Strahl discusses Visual Studio 2005.
  • Rick Strahl discusses the newly released ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 (MS AJAX)
  • Rick Strahl discusses the new ASP.NET Orcas beta release.
  • Rick Strahl discusses ATLAS, Microsoft's ASP.NET implementation of AJAX.
  • Markus Egger discusses the new Aux Display feature supported in Windows "Longhorn".
  • So what the heck is Rod doing with Stewie and Brian Griffin (of Family Guy fame) you ask? Well, Rod is sharpening his axe.
  • Rod Paddock's Nov/Dec 2008 Editorial
  • CoDe Focus Mobile Editorial by Markus Egger
  • Rod Paddock Editorial Article November December 04 Issue
  • Rick Strahl discusses building rich internet applications
  • May/June 2008 Editorial Article by Rod Paddock
  • Rod looks at the many options available to developers these days and having to choose what's best for your clients.
  • May/June 2010 Editorial by Rod Paddock.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial July August 2004 Issue
  • Rod sniffs out some questionable code.
  • Sept/Oct 2013 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • July/August 2003 Editorial by Rod Paddock.
  • David Stevenson Editorial Article Jan/Feb 2002
  • Rod explores some of the things that hold us back when we want to start a new project, including FEAR.
  • You’ve had reviews, feedback, or criticism—it’s part of dealing with creativity and discipline in any workplace. Melanie gives some advice on receiving and giving negative comments with positive results.
  • Nov/Dec 2013 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Customer relationships are an often-overlooked part of what we, as programmers, do.But customers are essential; after all, they're the ones we are creating systems for. We've heard from many programmers that customers are obstructive, stubborn, and computer-illiterate. Have you experienced similar frustrations? Why do projects often seem like battles, rather than cooperative efforts to solve specific problems?
  • Rod reflects with gratitude on lessons he learned when he first started consulting.
  • Eventually SQL Server databases in a production environment must move from one server to another. It’s important to plan for eventual database moves when architecting a database solution.Designers and developers often overlook the eventuality that a database will need to move to a different server. This month’s column is the first of three dealing with the issues surrounding database moves. In this first part, you’ll learn about the reasons why you should plan for moving...See More
  • Rod Paddock July/August 2012 Editorial
  • Rod focuses on what matters
  • Summer 2000 Editorial Article
  • Chris Williams embracing community Nov/Dec 10 column.
  • What is community? A quick look at the Wikipedia defines community as “a group of interacting organisms sharing an environment” and I think that pretty much nails it. In this column, I talk about the developer community as a whole and highlight some people, organizations and events I think you should check out.
  • Whether you know it or not, your code says something about you. Kate tells you how to read emotions in existing code and how to be a better member of the coding community when writing your own.
  • Rod encounters Motivational Difficulties and comes up with a way through them.
  • Every developer needs to test their code, or have it tested by someone.I don’t know about you, but I am horrible at testing my own code. Does this mean that I do not need to test my code? Heck, no! It is always best if you do not rely on your end user to test your code. This can end up with a very frustrated user, and your user can lose faith in your ability to get their project done.
  • Excel services is yet another important pillar in Microsoft’s business intelligence offering. Business users really like Excel because it is easy to use and they can add complex formulas to Excel to express their logic.They can do so without involving the IT guy. The problem with this scenario, however, is that it becomes very difficult to share some Excel sheets with their coworkers. Usually users prefer to send workbooks via email, but sometimes the workbooks are too l...See More
  • Our industry is constantly changing. So much so, that it is difficult to keep up sometimes.
  • Wow, another year has gone by, and as you read this, you are probably returning to the office after a few more or less relaxing holiday time spent with friends and family and a New Year's celebration. Interesting things have happened in our industry in the last 12 months, but I predict that the next 12 months will be quite a bit more interesting! Seldom before have I been as excited about new technologies and developments as I am now.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial Mar/April 2005
  • Article on Xiine by Markus Egger July/August 2007
  • Carl Franklin's .NET Rocks July/August 2007 column.
  • Jan/Feb 07 .Net Rocks Column
  • .NET Rocks column for Sept/Oct 2007
  • .Net Rocks by Carl Franklin Nov/Dec Article.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial November December 2003 Issue
  • In an interesting court case between rental car giant Hertz and international consulting firm Accenture, claims were filed that one party is in breach of contract. John uses this case to show how even small-shop independent consultants should carry some sort of liability insurance.
  • Ron Talmage discusses how developers can avaiod Transact-SQL Cursors
  • During the Visual Studio .NET Launch February 13 at VSLive! 2002 in San Francisco, Markus Egger and David Stevenson of Component Developer Magazine interviewed a panel of Microsoft personnel about the concept of developer communities.In this free-ranging discussion, we learned how Microsoft desires to support and encourage the growth inside developer "ecosystems" by focusing considerable resources on "community outreach."
  • We all know that applications have evolved, and not just towards Web deployment, .NET Framework development, and mash-up functionality.
  • Ken Getz Finalize Column - May/June 07
  • Rod Paddock Nov/Dec 2006 Editorial
  • What can you do to improve your job prospects in a weak economy? Paul has some thoughts on that.
  • From the consumer products associated with the MSN Butterfly, the Windows Live Platform has steadily grown and evolved.In this article you will discover some of the history behind the Windows Live Platform and explore where it is heading now and might be destined to go in the future. This article will explore the opportunities for you as a developer in this brave (nearly) new world.
  • Rod reflects on a long-term project and the quality of life.
  • Jan/Feb 08 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Rod Paddock January February 2005 Editorial Article
  • May/June 2003 Editorial by Rod Paddock.
  • Rick Strahl discuss scripting with jQuery.
  • A lot of programmers tend to over engineer their software solutions.In the course of my consulting, I have reviewed many applications from many companies. In many cases I find a lot of areas where the software was just too complex. The reasons for this are varied, but seem to be centered around a few main areas: inappropriate use of design patterns, the “not invented here” syndrome, and building a Cadillac when a Chevy would do the job. You can solve these issues in many...See More
  • Issue 1 2001 Editorial Article
  • Sept/Oct 08 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • If you’ve ever been to a conference, you’ve seen a code of conduct. Are they binding? What do they really mean, anyway? John tells us what’s wrong with most of them and how to create one that’s inclusive and legal.
  • Before you sign on the dotted line, be sure you know which rights you retain and which you give up when you accept that great new job. John makes sure that we read the contract and understand what it says.
  • The HIPAA laws are about more than keeping medical and health information private. John tells you what exactly your security obligations are, whether you are an employee or a freelancer.
  • What’s the difference between a trade secret and a patentable idea? What about copyright—how does that work into the equation. John makes it all clear with a focus on trade secrets.
  • When you work for someone, whether as a direct, full-time employee, as a contractor, or as a statutory employee, who owns the code that you produce? John explains who owns what and why.
  • Leaving a job is always stressful, but it’s worse when it’s not your idea. John looks at the legal implications for the end of a work assignment, and discusses pre-emptive things you should know when you’re signing that next contract.
  • Software piracy runs rampant these days! You need to protect your code using a good licensing scheme and obfuscation. If you develop software for a living (and since you are reading this magazine, I assume you are), at some point you will most likely figure out how to protect your investment in that software. Two things you will need to do to accomplish this are to add licensing to your software, and to obfuscate your code so others cannot reverse engineer your hard work...See More
  • At PDC 2005, Microsoft announced a new technology called Language Integrated Query (LINQ), which will be available with Visual Studio “Orcas” (the next version of Visual Studio). A lot of exciting new technologies are announced at every PDC, and as a result, LINQ got some attention, but not nearly as much as I think it deserves. LINQ represents the ability to run queries right inside of Visual Basic, C#, or any other .NET language.
  • November/December 2002 Editorial by Rod Paddock.
  • Rod Paddock Nov/Dec 2012 Editorial
  • Rod writes about his experiences in the trenches and how enthusiasm for novelty can sometimes cause problems.
  • July/August Managed Coder by Ted Neward
  • On June 27, 2011, <i>USA Today </i>ran an article headlined, “FTC Probe Puts Google On Guard”. In it, Scott Martin, the author, said that “The Federal Trade Commission has formally begun its investigation into Google’s search and advertising businesses, examining whether the company has unfairly used its monopoly. … Legal experts say the FTC inquiry marks a turning point for the company as it will come under heightened regulatory scrutiny.” History does not offer great h...See More
  • Nov/Dec 2011 Managed Coder by Ted Neward
  • July/August 2013 Managed Coder Article
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedule keeps a programmer’s “nose to the grindstone”; every so often, it’s important to take a breather and discover what there is to find—ironically, what you find can often help you write better software. If you’re new to the industry, trying to figure out what to study, much less what to study next, frequently turns into the “Paradox of Choice.”
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone.” Every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-what we find can often help us write software better.Philosophy seems a strange partner to the software craftsman, but ironically a brief dip in the waters of abstract thought will help hone skills later useful to the craft of code, models, and workable software.
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers’ “nose to the grindstone;” every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find. Ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.
  • March/April 2012 Managed Coder article by Ted Neward
  • Jan/Feb 2012 Managed Coder by Ted Neward
  • Ted tells us how everyone is an "idiot" every now and then, and how to make the most of the situation.
  • Ted explores the myth of benchmarking and how to make sure that yours are valid.
  • Ted Neward's Nov/Dec 2012 Column
  • Ted explains why branding is important, no matter how big or small your company is.
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone”; every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.Psychology seems no less strange a partner to the software craftsman than philosophy, but understanding how we engage in that practice called “thought” and “feeling” improves interpersonal skills, like h...See More
  • Ted takes a look at what skills are necessary to be a great manager.
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers’ “nose to the grindstone;” every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.
  • Ted talks about the importance of identifying core competencies.
  • May/June 2012 Managed Coder Article by Ted Neward
  • Nov//Dec 2013 Managed Coder by Ted Neward
  • Ted talks about how hiring experience might seem expensive, but it could save you money in the end.
  • Ted talks to us about things that scare us and how to get through it.
  • Mar/April 2013 Manager Coder Article
  • Ted shows us how it doesn't take a CS degree to know how to make great apps.
  • Ted looks at meetings to help us determine whether we're motivated to do the work.
  • Ted talks about the difference between being motivated and needing motivation in the first of a series on the subject.
  • Ted Neward explains how taking the negative approach just might lead to leaner, cleaner code.
  • Ted Neward's b-monthly column on development. This issue Ted discusses the concept of developer passion.
  • Ted takes a look at how to tell if a process is broken.
  • Ted talks about professional behavior and what politics has to do with the workplace.
  • Sept/Oct 2012 Managed Coder Article
  • Ted takes a serious look at who's responsible when things go wrong.
  • Jan/Feb 2013 - Managed Coder by Ted Neward
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone”; every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.Philosophy seems a strange partner to the software craftsman, but a brief dip in the waters of abstract thought will often help hone skills later useful to the craft of code, models, and dealing with idiot users.
  • Ted talks about getting trapped in old habits.
  • Ted talks about why it is we're always running out of time--or THINK we are.
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone”; every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone.” Every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.Life as a programmer is difficult enough, but what happens when even the simplest conversation with other programmers on your team (much less the customers) goes awry?
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone”; every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.When programming and psychology mix, usually it draws rolled eyes and heavy sighs from the programmer community. But when push comes to shove, knowing a little about how our minds work can only help keep...See More
  • Mar/April 2011 Managed CODE Article
  • Writing software is hard, particularly when the schedules keep programmers “nose to the grindstone”; every so often, it’s important to take a breather and look around the world and discover what we can find-ironically, what we find can often help us write software better.Philosophy doesn’t just question the imponderables about the universe; sometimes it shows us the limitations of our own, programming-trained mind, and leaves us to question the approaches we take in buil...See More
  • Mike takes a close look at how to deal with legacy code and the problems of re-using and maintaining source code.
  • July/August 2013 Manager's Corner by Mike Yeager
  • Mike talks about the different kinds of motivation and how, as a manager, to contribute to maintaining motivation among the workers on your project.
  • When your team drastically changes size, you’ll understand Mike’s parallel lessons from writing code.
  • I’ve been working on a technical assessment of a system for a new client during the last few weeks. As I looked at line after line of the source code they gave me, I saw test-driven design (TDD), inversion of control (IOC), dependency injection (DI), and plenty of other TLAs (three letter acronyms). I saw “convention over configuration.” I saw layer upon layer of abstraction. There was more unit test code than code. Code coverage was very high. Marvelous! I can almost he...See More
  • Take your company to the next level when you consider all of a client’s requests. No one can see the future, but it’s possible that the unreasonable thing that your client asks for is your best guess at how to grow your own business.
  • Words aren’t the only aspect of good communication. Mike teaches us that the code should stand on its own, now, next week, next year, and for the next decade.
  • If your calendar has more meetings scheduled into it that time to work, you’ll appreciate Mike Yeager’s suggestions for making meetings more efficient.
  • Mike teaches us the value of taking a vacation--it's good for the whole team!
  • Simplicity doesn’t mean more abstract: it means more basic and clear. Mike tells us how to manage projects without introducing unnecessary complexity.
  • Most people troll the Internet for technical details, yet CODE Magazine manages to soldier on in print (and online). Markus takes a look at where we’ve been and what it took to get to where we are today.
  • Moving a SQL Server database from one server to another is simple-initially. But there are various methods for moving a database, and some have more advantages than others. Investigating the types of moves ahead of time can make planning for a database migration easier.It takes essentially three steps to move a database from one server to another: take the database out of production, copy it to another server, and then bring the copy back into production. While you can c...See More
  • Executive Letter
  • xIn the past two installments of this series I’ve discussed two key aspects of moving a SQL Server database from one server (or instance) to another. First I covered the advantages of designing databases to make them easier to move, and then I looked at the methods that you can use to move a database. Now it’s time to look specifically at the types of database dependencies that you must account for after you move a database.
  • Rod considers the benefits and pitfalls of having multiple clients running multiple tools.
  • Recently, I received an email comment on a blog post I wrote roughly 3 1/2 years ago. I had completely forgotten about writing the post, but as soon as I saw the title I remembered every word of it. It also got me thinking about who the guy was that wrote it... then and now.
  • Nov/Dec 2008 MVP Corner by Juilia Lerman
  • Recently I accepted a management/leadership position, one where I can be the proverbial “player-coach.” It’s a position I’ve actually been doing for some time, and it’s now official.
  • Sept/Oct 2007 MVP Corner Article
  • Ken Getz July/August 2007 .FINALIZE() column
  • JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) has become the de facto data transfer standard for client-side Web applications that use JavaScript. JSON is a JavaScript-based object/value encoding format that looks very close to raw JavaScript and can be very easily parsed by JavaScript code because JavaScript can effectively evaluate a JSON string and re-materialize an object from it. Unlike XML there’s no parsing involved in the process, so it’s easy to work with and also relativel...See More
  • Rod Paddock Editorial March April 2004 Issue
  • A lot of new things are going on at CODE Magazine, both online and offl ine, and both directly associated with the magazine as well as efforts even more directly related to your development efforts. You may have already seen some of the things we do with CODE Consulting (www.codemag.com/consulting) and CODE Training (www.codemag.com/training), but today I would like to draw your attention to other things.
  • Cover Headlines: VS 2010, C#, VB, EF, Silverlight, ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC
  • Sept/Oct 2011 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Ted asks the age-old question: When are you finished growing?
  • Ted discusses the general impossibility of having all the information at the onset of a project--or a decision.
  • Rod Paddock's July/August 2011 Editorial article
  • Rod gives you some pointers on how to get the most out of conferences and why you should go.
  • Ted looks at whether or not personality, race, gender, or style have any bearing on whether someone will be successful at work or not.
  • Ted looks at how DADA and OODA thought processes can help you make smarter --if not faster--decisions.
  • Ted talks about encouraging--and enabling--your team to grow their skills.
  • Ted looks at what makes the difference between a good leader and a great one.
  • Ted looks at how interviewing practices need to change with the times, just as software does.
  • Ted discusses the nature of leading and how it affects the team.
  • Ted considers leadership that makes a difference.
  • Ted talks about being a manager, having a manager, and the difference between a good and a bad manager.
  • 13 Things Mentally Strong Programmers Avoid
  • Ted takes a look at an age-old technique for helping new devs acclimatize to new jobs.
  • Ted points out that no matter who you are and what you do, you can't ever truly know someone else's perspective.
  • For an industry that prides itself on its analytical ability and abstract mental processing, we often don’t do a great job applying that mental skill to the most important element of the programmer’s tool chest—that is, ourselves.
  • Ted takes a look at what it takes to make a team successful--is there a magic formula?
  • In this column Ted discusses real perils of being a part of a startup.
  • Ted gives some good advice for what to do when you become a manager for the first time.
  • Ted writes about the importance of trust to a team's success.
  • Rod Paddock's May/June 2009 Editorial article.
  • It seems like only yesterday that Facebook acquired Parse so that developers could focus more on the frontend than the backend of their apps. In January 2017, they’re shutting Parse down. Jason tells us what our options are.
  • Rod continues the tale of an enormous conversion project.
  • Rod's big project is drawing to a close, and it's time to consider User Acceptance Testing.
  • Ron Talmage discusses performance counters in SQL Server.
  • Digital content is becoming more popular. E-book readers encourage people that like to read, to read even more because they can take all of their books on one lightweight gadget. Even though I still love hard copies of a book (you don’t need power to read it), I have had very good experiences with several digital readers.
  • Nov/Dec 2010 Post Mortem Article by Dan Appleman
  • EPS builds a user interface for the iOS that is very similar to the Android and desktop versions.
  • When you read about history, the stories are mostly about the people involved, and not as often about the tools and technologies people used. In software engineering, the stories about the people involved are known as “human factors” - and it is often the human factors in the life of a software project that make life interesting for software developers.
  • July/August2010 Post Mortem by Markus Egger
  • Do you store information about your customers, clients, suppliers, vendors, and your employees on a computer system? If so, you need to be aware of the many different movements that are happening, at least in the United States, about keeping that data secure. Many states are enacting or have enacted legislation requiring businesses to not only safeguard that information, but also force those businesses to notify customers if such information becomes compromised
  • Mar/April 2007 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Rod Paddock - Editorial - May/June 2006
  • Rod Paddocks Mar/Apr 08 editorial article.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial for Sept/Oct 2007
  • Rick Strahl discusses Rest-Based Ajax Services.
  • Rod Paddock - March April 02 Editorial
  • Rod Paddocks Jan/Feb 09 Editorial
  • Ron Talmage discusses scaling out database writes.
  • May/June 2013 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Jan/Feb 2012 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Rod visits Japan, where an apprenticeship of 10 years might lead to being qualified for only the most basic of tasks. How committed are YOU to your craft, he asks?
  • Rod Paddock Nov/Dec 2010 Editorial
  • Mar/April 2010 Editoral by Rod Paddock
  • Rod Paddock Sept/Oct 09 Editorial
  • Rod Paddock Editorial Mar/Apr 2012
  • Rod Paddock Editorial May Junel 2004 Issue
  • Rod Paddock Sep/Oct 2010 Editorial
  • Melanie shakes up her routine and discovers something interesting.
  • If you’ve ever had to step through legacy code—even your own—you understand what a mystery some of it can be. Chris provides some tips and tricks for figuring it out.
  • March/April 2013 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Ron Talmage discusses SQL Server 2005 in this introductory SQL Server Observer Newsletter
  • Ron Talmage discusses the roles of SQL Server databases and instances in high availability scenarios.
  • September/October 2003 Editorial by Rod Paddock.
  • Rod Paddock's Jan/Feb 07 Editorial
  • Issue 2 2001 David Stevenson Editorial Article
  • Back in 2005, when Ruby on Rails started appearing on developers’ radars, there was an explosion of blogs and articles discussing how dangerous these loosey goosey languages were, with their hippy dynamic typing. And many predicted dire fates for companies foolish enough to take the plunge. Regular readers are certainly familiar with Ted Neward, who makes technology predictions each year on his blog. Here’s what Ted said on January 1, 2006:
  • Nov/Dec 2007 Editorial Column by Rod Paddock
  • Rod explores the similarities between making fine art and writing code.
  • Rick Strahl discusses considerations when writing JavaScript
  • Rod Paddock Jan/Feb 2013 Editorial
  • Rod reflects on how lucky we are to work in an industry where a trip down the rabbit hole can be good for you and for your clients.
  • May/June 2007 Editorial by Rod Paddock
  • Rod Paddock Editorial March April 2004 Issue
  • Melanie talks about birdsong, music, and language.
  • Rod Paddock - Editorial for Tablet PC 2006
  • Dino explains the business layer so that even a seven-year-old can understand.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial July August 2002 Issue
  • Here’s a bit of news for you: Despite all the criticism and despite all the naysayers, Windows 8 is actually a very good operating system. Improvements to the desktop are good and welcome. A lot of the underlying tech for WinRT is quite impressive. Microsoft should be applauded for their willingness to invent and change. However, because of a long list of puzzling decisions, and due to a lack of polish and packaging, Windows 8 just doesn’t add up to a good product that s...See More
  • Dino has a somewhat literary take on the things that go wrong in software development. You’ll follow him through the seven rings of Software Hell in a parallel to Dante’s “Divine Comedy.”
  • Rod Paddock Editorial Article July/August 2005
  • Rod takes a look at the great changes coming because of ASP.NET vNext
  • Fall 2000 Editorial Markus Egger and Rick Strahl
  • Ron Talmage discusses 32-bit vs. 64-bit version of SQL Server 2005
  • Markus Egger Fall 2000 Services Article
  • Rod Paddock's Editorial for the CoDe Focus Whidbey issue.
  • Rod Paddock Nov/Dec Editorial Article.
  • An invaluable self-starter kit from Paul, who has gone through this himself. Paul breaks it down into categories and other useful information you should know.If you are considering making a jump from being an employee to being self-employed, the following article will help you make the transition.
  • This editorial reflects on past conferences and looks forward to 2014.
  • Rick Strahl discusses LINQ to SQL features.
  • The Web View October 2007
  • David Stevenson's Column - July August 02
  • Rod Paddock Editorial Article May/June 2005
  • Eric Rudder talks about VFP 8.
  • Ken Levy discusses VFP8.
  • As a .NET architect and developer I cannot imagine my everyday work without Visual Studio. I was always in a strange excitement when waiting for a new CTP, Beta or RTM of Visual Studio because I always expected some great new features with every release. During the years I have bought a few third-party add-ins and utilities for Visual Studio to make my development tasks easier and even created small add-ins to produce some useful piece of code. I knew that Visual Studio ...See More
  • Rod Paddock editorial Jan/Feb 2011
  • March/April 2003 Editorial by Rod Paddock.
  • Rick Strahl discusses Web Application Projects
  • Rick Strahl discusses the current status of the Web.
  • Welcome to our second CoDe Focus issue on mobile PC development.
  • Welcome Letter from the VSX Team
  • SPring 2000 Editorial
  • Welcome to the third Fox Focus issue!As I write this (publishing deadlines being what they are) I’ve recently returned from a trip to Europe where I spoke at three different Visual FoxPro conferences in Germany, Amsterdam, and France. I showed off many of the new features coming in Sedna as well as a number of the enhancements being created by the community using the awesome extensibility built into VFP.
  • Markus Egger 5 Year Anniversary Editorial May/June 2005
  • Dian spends an evening re-watching Captain Marvel with a group of friends and they realize that there’s a lot more to that movie than just a rollicking good film.
  • Rod Paddock Editorial September October 2004 Issue
  • Rick Strahl discusses ASP.NET Web Forms
  • Markus Egger discusses screen resolutions.
  • Markus Egger discusses the importance of a solid basis of knowledge.
  • Rod Paddock July/August 06 editorial
  • Whether you’re in the middle of your career or just starting out, women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) have unique challenges. Listen in as Sumeya and Sara interview each other about it.
  • Mar/April 09 Editorial by Markus Egger
  • Rod Paddock Sept/Oct Editorial
  • Rod Paddock July/August 2013 Editorial
  • Melanie talks about the need for testing, editing, and otherwise closely examining your work before sending it out into the world.