Articles filed in category 'CODE Framework Related'

  • From users to developers, mobile applications used to be (not so long ago) uninteresting. Complicated flows, non-intuitive screens and limited features available used to discourage anyone. PDAs had a poor user interface with limited colors (the first ones were only black and white). It was very complicated and boring to write any code for it. Cell phones used to be a device where you could make and receive phone calls. Eventually you could play some games. But you know w...See More
  • The big news about Windows 8 is its new mode based on the Metro design language and UI paradigm. Metro apps are based on the new WinRT (Windows Runtime) and can be built in two distinct ways. One utilizes HTML5 and JavaScript, while the other uses XAML for the user interface definition and C#, Visual Basic, or native C++ as the language behind the scenes. Not surprisingly, the later has often been compared to other XAML-based setups, in particular Silverlight, but also W...See More
  • CODE Publisher, Markus Egger, hijacks this issue's Editorial and discusses what technologies developers should spend time and resources on.
  • A lot of new things are going on at CODE Magazine, both online and offl ine, and both directly associated with the magazine as well as efforts even more directly related to your development efforts. You may have already seen some of the things we do with CODE Consulting (www.codemag.com/consulting) and CODE Training (www.codemag.com/training), but today I would like to draw your attention to other things.
  • It seems you cannot turn in one direction or another and not hear about a new JavaScript library or CSS framework that promises to be the silver bullet-to be THE thing that will make web-based application development a breeze. This article will introduce you to Knockout.js (http://knockoutjs.com/). Knockout.js is an open source library (under the MIT License) that is pure JavaScript that works with any existing web framework and every mainstream browser. Further, Knockou...See More
  • ListBoxes suck. Except that statement is not true anymore. Not in WPF and Silverlight anyway, where ListBoxes have evolved from simplistic controls to true workhorse objects. ListBoxes have been around since the beginning of Windows (and other GUIs) and have served a pervasive yet simple purpose, which can be summed up as “show me a list of labels in a list with a scroll bar.” A premise that has its uses but is not sophisticated enough for advanced data presentation, ...See More
  • Markus continues his series on anti-patterns with an interesting look at when to take advantage of certain techniques and when to give them a wide berth.
  • Just when you think a container is simple, your user resizes the screen and mayhem ensues. If you want to know what happened—or prevent it, better yet—read Markus’ piece about the XAML layout engine.
  • In the second article of the series, Markus talks about keeping your code readable and maintainable by controlling how often and where you reuse objects.
  • Markus shows us why virtualization gets a bad reputation and how to clean it up.
  • XAML properties don’t always behave as you think they might. Markus explains how they work and shows you some nifty ways to use these powerful tools.